Spalted Spatula

Ideal for stirring that cake mix…?

Spalted Beech wood hand carved spatula by Peter Maton lying on cloth with wood shavings. Colour Landscape. © P. Maton 2014 whittleandstitch.net

Spalted Beech wood hand carved spatula by Peter Maton lying on cloth with wood shavings. Colour Landscape. © P. Maton 2014 whittleandstitch.net

More Spalted Beech for stirring, mixing and spreading.

All the best.

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Axe handle testing.

Nothing like a dead standing Oak tree to test the fit and strength of a newly made Ash axe handle…

two axes in stump of felled Oak Tree. Monochrome Landscape. © P. Maton 2014 whittleandstitch.net

…both handles were hung and secured only with Oak wedges. Happily they both passed the test without fault.

The heads are an old 4lb Gilpin (or is it a Brades, I can’t remember now) and an unstamped Maine pattern double bit.

All the best.

 

Spatulas and a spoon – first stage, axe carving.

I have a few large beech logs that have been awaiting my attention since last spring. I was slack and didn’t seal the ends so I was unsure how workable the wood would be after so long, fortunately the workshop isn’t exactly a dry environment.

Splitting spalted Beech log with an axe and mallet maul club. Hand made wood craft. Colour landscape. © P. Maton 2015 whittleandstitch.net

Happily they haven’t cracked too much and best of all they have spalted beautifully without going too soft to be viable. I already want to make some bowls from this stuff.

Axe wood carving, spalted Beech spoon and spatula. Hand made wood craft. Colour landscape. © P. Maton 2015 whittleandstitch.net

After splitting down some suitable sized billets I spent some time roughing out a large spoon & two Gooseneck Spatulas™ (ha ha). As well as being an enjoyable way to get back up to speed with the axe it is a good way of assessing the workability of the wood, if the spalt had gone too far the impact of the axe would soon make it apparent.

Axe wood carving, spalted Beech spoon and spatula. Hand made wood craft. Colour landscape. © P. Maton 2015 whittleandstitch.net

Now the basic shape and lines have been established they will be further refined and finished with hook and straight bladed knives.

I’ll report back when they have been done.

All the best.

Spalted Beech Spatula

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

This spatula has just been wiped over with Flax Seed Oil to seal it after being carved. As usual great care was taken to ensure the surface was made smooth with a knife to avoid the use of sand paper.

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

 

Hand carved wooden spatula in spalted Beech by Peter Maton Sussex UK 2014  http://whittleandstitch.net

Before and After

Spalted Beech Spoon Hand Carved by Peter Maton 2014 Whittle & Stitch

I thought you might like to see how this spoon began taking shape and what it looks like after a few years of use.

This one began, as many do, being hewn with an axe from a billet of wood split from a Beech Log. The wood had spent over a year weathering in the yard at my workshop and had developed a Spalt running through the grain; lovely patterns caused by fungus penetrating the wood and forming hard dark barriers at their margins. If left too long in such damp conditions the wood becomes crumbly and brittle in places but fortunately I used this piece before that had happened.

Spalted Beech Spoon Hand Carved by Peter Maton axe work in progress 2014 Whittle & Stitch

Once the rough shape is formed with the axe I use whittling knives & curved spoon knives to refine it further before setting the piece aside for a while to allow any remaining moisture escape.

Spoon knives by Svante Djarv of Sweden & straight whittling knife  with blade by Dorset Woodland Blades and handle & sheathe by P.Maton 2014 Whittle and stitch.net

Once the wood is dry the knives are used to carve the final smooth surface and the piece is sealed with Flax seed oil to protect it.

Here are some images of this one after it has been used for a few years and begun to gain some real character.

Spalted Beech Spoon Hand Carved by Peter Maton 2014 Whittle & StitchSpalted Beech Spoon detail Hand Carved by Peter Maton 2014 Whittle & Stitch Spalted Beech Spoon Hand Carved by Peter Maton 2014 Whittle & Stitch Spalted Beech Spoon detail Hand Carved by Peter Maton 2014 Whittle & Stitch

Some of my work. (gallery)

I am busy writing new content to add to Whittle & Stitch so in the mean time I thought I’d post a couple of galleries of some the work I have done.

Treen.

Spoons & bowls.

All items have been hand carved using axes, adzes, whittling knives and spoon knives. No sand paper has been used so the finish is smooth and durable while retaining the tactile faceted surface created by the tools that made them. Flax Seed Oil is used to seal and protect them during use so they age gracefully and beautifully over the years.

Tools.

Tools for green wood workers, coppicing, bushcraft and outdoor enthusiasts with hand made wooden handles & leather cases.

The two axes here have traditional straight handles carved from Ash secured with Oak wedges. Careful attention is paid to the throw and alignment of the heads and the direction of the grain in the wood to ensure efficiency and durability during use.

The Finish style Puukko (knife) has a Masir Birch handle with a Lauri PT 95 blade . The sheath is hand dyed vegetable tanned leather with a Beech wood liner for safe and secure carriage.

There will be more to follow shortly.

Thank you for looking.